The Siren Song of SHIPtember 2016 [Volume 3 of 4]

Matango! is in trouble, constant reader, the fight against the clock is not going well and the local Teamsters seem to be spending more time riding motorcycles and writing blog entries than actually building the ship.  Several issues should be readily apparent from the photo below, but I’ll go through them anyway, that’s the whole point of the exercise.

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I kept the concept art in the photo for reference, but from this point on, the model will look less and less like it’s inspiration.  With days ticking past, I decided to abandon any notion of accuracy to the source material.  I wasted far too much time trying to figure out both the crew cabin and the nose, without any real success. I’m gonna take a second and complain about the shitty availability of parts in orange, but only a second because I think a more skilled builder could have figured out a better solution for both areas.  And…I should probably have figured that out ahead of time when I selected an all orange piece of concept-art.  So, ultimately I went the easy route and plugged in the 1-piece helicopter nose.  I dig it, I’ve always liked that window pattern but I admit that it’s a bit of a cop-out, a brick-built solution would have been ideal.  The biggest downside of the canopy is that it’s not as wide as I would have liked.  Simon is right, when he says the hard road is the better road through SHIPtember, but I need an easier route from this point forward, if I have any chance to make the end of the month deadline.

I flipped the cargo pods on their sides, to give the whole thing a slightly lower profile.  I’m still not completely happy with the look, but I’m not ready to redesign them either.  With so much left to do, and so little time to do it, going backwards would be a mistake.  I may switch them back to their original orientation, this is by no means final.  Nothing is.  In case you’re wondering, the legs are still in the game-plan but I didn’t want to crowd the update photo with them.  The legs are just waiting for a frame.

I included the SHIPruler in the photo so you can see how far off I am at this point.  The wings are going to push out further to the left and right but I’m not sure that they will get to 100 studs.  Front to back is even worse right now.  This is the two-headed tyranny of the calendar and the ruler.

All that said, the greater threat to Matango’s chance of completion is my growing apathy towards the project.  I’m not excited to look at it anymore, now it’s entered the realm of obligation or on especially bad days, a chore.  I’m frustrated with my inability to translate the subject matter and I don’t have a clear vision of where to go with the design.  I’m going to keep building until the end of the month and see what happens, and perhaps beyond the deadline if I still think it’s a concept worth developing.  I have one more BrickLink order on the way and that might re-energize me.  The bottom line is that the Manifesto is taking up more of my free time than I thought, and I just don’t have the time to write and build with the same level of investment.  Tune in for the exciting final volume in this SHIPtember series to see what happens!

Oh, and feel free to provide building suggestions in the comments.  Flickr has been zero help in that department, but it’s not just me, I don’t see a lot of good critique going on, just encouragement.  Encouragement is cool, and I’ve received my share and more on this project, but I get some really useless comments too.  When you boil it down, people generally have only 3 thoughts on Matango!

  1. That’s a lot of orange / you’re gonna need a lot more orange.
  2. That’s huge!
  3. The legs won’t support it.

None of those statements are particularly helpful or insightful, but at least they too the time to leave their thoughts?  Here’s a thought for you…

Matango!

UPDATE:  Friend of the blog and crazy-good builder Pico van Grootveld was generous enough to work up a few sketches to help me find a way forward with Mantango!  His treatment of the legs is both daunting and delightful, and the little motorcycle is completely rad!  Thanks Pico!  I’m both flattered and grateful that you took the time to assist this less-than-humble SHIPwright in his time of need.